Skeptic News: Mud, Medium, Messiah.

NZ Skeptics Newsletter

 

Why I am a Skeptic

Last week Craig introduced a new section to our newsletter, which he’s named Why Are You A Skeptic. We’re keen to hear from each of you about why you’re a skeptic, and to publish your stories in the newsletter. If you’re up for it, please send your story to [email protected]. For now, here’s my story of how I came to skepticism, and why I’m involved with the NZ Skeptics:

I grew up as a fairly inquisitive kid, and liked to challenge those who tried to push religion on us impressionable kids - the church leaders who came in to talk at school assemblies, adults who ran the local youth group, etc. After a weird period in my teens and twenties when I became a Christian, I returned to my atheist roots with a vengeance, upset with myself that I’d let myself be fooled into believing such nonsense.

From atheism, it was a short hop to what I consider the wider field of skepticism. Not only were gods nonsense, but so were psychics, acupuncturists and UFO hunters. The more I read, the more I realised that there are a lot of people out there who, whether they are misguided or malicious, are selling people a lie. From a $50 Reiki session to a $5,000 speaker cable, unscrupulous sellers everywhere were, and are, using lies and falsehoods to make a quick buck.

After a few years of consuming skeptical content online, I decided I wanted to do something practical, something of use. So I went along to my local Skeptics in the Pub to see what other skeptics were up to. It was refreshing to meet a group of people who had the same worldview as I had. Although the regulars at the Wellington Skeptics in the Pub came from a wide range of backgrounds and professions, and were/are a weird and wonderful group, we all had the same respect for evidence and critical thinking - and that made it feel like I belonged. Since joining Skeptics in the Pub I’ve also joined the NZ Skeptics and helped form the Society for Science Based Heatlhcare, and I’ve tried to help make a difference where I can.

I think the reason I’m a skeptic is because I see all the scammers and the con artists out there, the preachers and the conspiracy theorists, the naturopaths and the vaccine deniers, and I want to do something about it. I want to help to stop these people from making people’s lives worse, and I think this can be done by shining a light on their bullshit, warning others about how ineffective, costly and sometimes dangerous their nonsense can be, and reporting them to the relevant authorities or professional bodies when they’re behaving in an unethical manner. Working with others in the skeptical community has been a good way to tackle those who try to take advantage of others.

Mark Honeychurch

Black Oxygen Organics - a new panacea

Black Oxygen Organics is a recent craze in alternative medicine. Many people swear by it, saying that it can treat all sorts of conditions - from heart issues and ADHD to COVID and cancer.

But what is it, who’s behind it, and does it work? Well, it turns out the answers to the first two questions will help us to figure out the third one.

The Black Oxygen Organics website (now archived) calls their product “A gift from the ground” and says:

“Fulvic acid is the end product and smallest particle of the decomposition of ancient, organic matter. Organic matter is just a fancy way of saying peat bog. When extracted, purified and delivered in a liquid supplement form, it carries all the nutritional information, anti-oxidant capacity and genetic coding of everything in that decomposed matter.”

So, basically this product is dirt. It’s fairly interesting dirt, as it’s being dug up from the bottom of a peat bog, and has been sitting there for thousands of years breaking down into chemicals such as fulvic acid, but it’s still dirt - and as such this is a very complex mix of chemicals, bacteria and all sorts of stuff. And people are meant to mix it with water and then spread it on their skin, bathe their children in it, and even drink it.

Of course, with something sciencey sounding like fulvic acid, there are going to be unscrupulous people who claim it has healing powers. And the internet is awash with companies selling fulvic acid tonics, drops, pills, powders and lotions. Even in NZ we have companies selling this cure-all and making claims about its amazing abilities.

Black Oxygen Organics, though, has been doing it differently. The company has been advertising their miracle mud through Instagram and Tik Tok, using the hashtag #BOO and harnessing the power of media influencers who are compensated for getting new customers to sign up to buy the dirt, through a Multi Level Marketing scheme - and at $110 for a small bag of dirt. And when it comes to this social media advertising, medical claims are being made by “independent agents” of this MLM, so you end up with an ever escalating list of fantastical claims being made - and an inability for the authorities to police the problem as it’s so widespread. And that’s how the company can get away with making claims of being able to treat autism, cancer and COVID - because technically the company itself isn’t making the claims, their “agents” are.

So, who’s behind this product? Marc Saint-Onge is the creator of Black Oxygen Organics, and it turns out that this isn’t his first time selling peat bog to unsuspecting customers:

Marc’s been in trouble in his native Canada since the 80s, when he was fined for practising medicine without a licence. As we just heard, Marc used to run a company called Golden Moor. That’s just one of several companies he’s created over the years since he was first in trouble - he’s also run Anti-Rheuma Bath and NuWTR. He also mentioned that he learned orthotherapy, a massage technique that claims to be able to treat medical conditions, and elsewhere he’s claimed hat he’s a naturopath, reiki master, herbalist and aromatherapist - all classic red flags, as these are all well known to be disproven alternative therapies.

So the claims are hard to believe, and the man has a history of selling mud and getting in trouble for it. But what about the evidence? Of course, there is none - or at least there’s no good quality evidence. That’s par for the course with alternative medicine. But there’s now so many bad claims on the internet that the website WebMD warns:

“People use fulvic acid for conditions such as allergies, eczema (atopic dermatitis), cancer, Alzheimer disease, and others, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.”

Beyond the baseless medical claims, in the US testing has been done on the Black Oxygen Organics product, showing that it has elevated levels of lead and arsenic. So this product is not only useless, it’s potentially dangerous. And this is pretty ironic, given that one of the claims made about the product is that it works as a heavy metal detox.

Marc’s LinkedIn page has been deleted, and his company has recently closed down, as has happened with Marc’s previous mud selling companies. Health Canada has been proactive in making this happen, including forcing a recall of their products and putting out an announcement that said things plainly:

“Stop taking these products”

But it looks like there’s a pattern here, though, and Marc will likely be back soon with another company selling his mud to unsuspecting consumers. Now, though, it seems like he’s learned the power of social media, and the ability of Multi Level Marketing schemes to hook people in, and so I suspect his next venture, if he doesn’t end up behind bars, will make him a lot of money again.

The Tiger King Psychic


I’m sure most people know the story of the Tiger King, a documentary series which became required viewing last year around the world when many countries went into lockdown. The series followed Joe Exotic, a flamboyant character who ran a big cat attraction and ended up behind bars for some of his questionable life decisions.


Season 2 of the show is now out, and I’ve been watching it recently. Given that Joe Exotic ended up in jail at the end of season 1, season two aims its focus elsewhere - concentrating on the disappearance of Carole Baskin’s husband Don Lewis, over 20 years ago.

In the middle of the season, Don’s now middle-aged children are shown trying to find out what happened to their father, employing a gimmicky lawyer and a conspiracy minded internet sleuth to help them. But one person in particular caught my eye - Troy Griffin, a psychic:

His title is a mouthful - “Christian Clairvoyant Empathic Psychic Medium”. Troy apparently uses remote viewing, and for murders can use this “skill” to find locations of interest.

From what I’ve found online, Troy claims that he works for police departments, charging up to $250 an hour. He told ABC news, who interviewed him as part of a story of a missing pregnant woman, that his success rate is around 20% (which is interestingly a lot more humble than many psychic detectives), but when pressed by ABC to give one example that they could look into, he couldn’t even manage to name one. The news company contacted the police about the pregnant woman case, to hear from them about Troy’s claims of being involved in the investigation, but the police said they had had “no official contact” with him and were unaware that he was involved at all.

In front of the cameras for season 2 of the Tiger King, Troy went looking for the place where Don was supposedly killed. When he finds what he thinks is the location, he talks of feeling “bad juju” and then he starts retching and becomes visibly upset - so much so, that the daughter of the deceased man has to comfort him.

To me, this is the absolute pits. I’ve always liked using the term grief vampire to refer to psychics, but to pretend that you’ve psychically connected to a traumatic event, and then play-act that you are affected by this trauma to the extent that a grieving family has to comfort you, is taking it to another level. This man had the nerve to appear on camera feeding on the emotions of a missing, possibly murdered, man’s children, getting them to give him attention and sympathy for his fake emotional state. Ugh.
 

Brian Tamaki is God

A couple of weeks ago I attended an online sermon from Destiny Church with a few friends. The sermon started off fairly tame, with Brian joking about viewers eating popcorn - so I went and grabbed a bag of popcorn for us to eat while we watched. I figured it was the least a group of heathens could do.

Brian continued a series of sermons he’s been giving for a few weeks now, about Revelation and the End of Days. Hilariously, when I checked the previous week’s sermon on YouTube this morning it came up with exactly 666 views:
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaq2IKPjy0g

Brian’s been telling his congregation that the end is nigh, but not too nigh. In fact, he made the claim that the end could come now, but he’s asked God to hold off - apparently Brian wants to have some “fun” before the end comes, so he’s applied for a time-out.

Brian spent some time talking about money, and how it is an idol that people worship - as he broadcast from his multi-million dollar mansion. He said that he is immune to the dangers of money, because he has money but money doesn’t have him. He went on to talk about other idols that people have, and said that the Sky Tower in Auckland is another idol - apparently it’s shaped like a vaccine needle, and we’re all worshipping this idol at the moment, rather than God. Brian’s message was very anti-vaccine, but at no point did he mention whether he has been vaccinated himself - I have my suspicions that he probably has been.

Eventually Brian, who has given himself promotions from Pastor to Bishop to Apostle, went one further. He talked about how one of the issues with the modern church is that, for all the good work they may do, nobody is willing to take the bold step of proclaiming that they are God - that God is a part of them. And of course Brian spelled out that he considers himself to be one with God - that, in part, he is God.

As a small mercy, viewership of the live stream never even reached 100 people, so it wasn't a great turnout - although maybe many of these viewers were entire families and possibly some people decided to watch the stream later on rather than streaming it live. But I hold out hope that, when given the choice to not watch Brian Tamaki spread his nonsense without them being spotted, many of his congregation just decided they’d rather have an extra couple of hours in bed!

Sneaky Scientology

Lake Alice Psychiatric Hospital made the news last week, with an 89 year old man being charged for his part in the abuse of children who were under the hospital’s care in the 1970s. Dr Selwyn Leeks, who was the lead psychiatrist at the centre, has been charged with “wilful ill treatment of a child”, but due to his ill health will not be prosecuted.

The media were obviously working hard to report on this news, and had been looking for experts to give them some informed opinions. Sadly for 3 News, they ended up being tricked into believing that the Citizens Commission for Human Rights (CCHR) is a legitimate, reputable organisation. In reality it’s a front organisation setup by Scientology, as a way to promote one of the many strange ideas that founder L. Ron Hubbard had - the idea that psychiatry is evil. The organisation’s website doesn’t even exist - there’s just a parking page:
 



L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology (an abusive group that deceivingly calls itself a religion) had mental health problems through most of his life, and was apparently dependent on psychiatric drugs. Possibly because of this dependence, he declared that psychiatry is all just a big lie, and that it is an “industry of death”. They even run a museum in Hollywood called “Psychiatry: An Industry of Death”. This is yet another of Hubbard’s weird ideas that Scientologists today are expected to continue with. As an illustration of just how oppressive Hubbard’s ideas are to Scientologists, I’ve heard that there’s a rule which means that Scientologists can only clean windows with vinegar and newspaper - because, according to L. Ron Hubbard, that’s all you should ever need for the job. I’ve taken some Scientology courses online, and they’re all about imparting Hubbard’s “wisdom” to followers - discredited ideas about how the mind works, how to learn properly, how to avoid trauma, and so on.

3 News ended up interviewing Mike Ferris, a well known Scientologist in New Zealand, last week - treating him like an expert. This isn’t overly surprising as it appears that Mike, and the CCHR, have also conned the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care into thinking that they are a legitimate organisation. Mike gave evidence to the commission in June this year.

In reality the Citizens Commission on Human Rights is just a mouthpiece for the ideological ideas of L. Ron Hubbard, a man who created a dangerous cult and hated psychiatry. It’s worrying to see victims, officials and the media all being hoodwinked by Scientology. These people are not involved because they want to help the victims, they just have an axe to grind - and, in fact, Scientology has mentally and physically mistreated, and continues to mistreat, thousands of its members every day.
 

If you have any news or thoughts you would like to see published in this newsletter, we would love to hear from you at:
[email protected]
if you want to support us by becoming a financial member, or would like to check your membership status, please go to:
https://skeptics.nz/join
Twitter
Facebook
YouTube
Website
Email
Copyright © 2021 NZ Skeptics, All rights reserved.


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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

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Skeptic News: Mud, Medium, Messiah.

NZ Skeptics Newsletter

 

Why I am a Skeptic

Last week Craig introduced a new section to our newsletter, which he’s named Why Are You A Skeptic. We’re keen to hear from each of you about why you’re a skeptic, and to publish your stories in the newsletter. If you’re up for it, please send your story to [email protected]. For now, here’s my story of how I came to skepticism, and why I’m involved with the NZ Skeptics:

I grew up as a fairly inquisitive kid, and liked to challenge those who tried to push religion on us impressionable kids - the church leaders who came in to talk at school assemblies, adults who ran the local youth group, etc. After a weird period in my teens and twenties when I became a Christian, I returned to my atheist roots with a vengeance, upset with myself that I’d let myself be fooled into believing such nonsense.

From atheism, it was a short hop to what I consider the wider field of skepticism. Not only were gods nonsense, but so were psychics, acupuncturists and UFO hunters. The more I read, the more I realised that there are a lot of people out there who, whether they are misguided or malicious, are selling people a lie. From a $50 Reiki session to a $5,000 speaker cable, unscrupulous sellers everywhere were, and are, using lies and falsehoods to make a quick buck.

After a few years of consuming skeptical content online, I decided I wanted to do something practical, something of use. So I went along to my local Skeptics in the Pub to see what other skeptics were up to. It was refreshing to meet a group of people who had the same worldview as I had. Although the regulars at the Wellington Skeptics in the Pub came from a wide range of backgrounds and professions, and were/are a weird and wonderful group, we all had the same respect for evidence and critical thinking - and that made it feel like I belonged. Since joining Skeptics in the Pub I’ve also joined the NZ Skeptics and helped form the Society for Science Based Heatlhcare, and I’ve tried to help make a difference where I can.

I think the reason I’m a skeptic is because I see all the scammers and the con artists out there, the preachers and the conspiracy theorists, the naturopaths and the vaccine deniers, and I want to do something about it. I want to help to stop these people from making people’s lives worse, and I think this can be done by shining a light on their bullshit, warning others about how ineffective, costly and sometimes dangerous their nonsense can be, and reporting them to the relevant authorities or professional bodies when they’re behaving in an unethical manner. Working with others in the skeptical community has been a good way to tackle those who try to take advantage of others.

Mark Honeychurch

Black Oxygen Organics - a new panacea

Black Oxygen Organics is a recent craze in alternative medicine. Many people swear by it, saying that it can treat all sorts of conditions - from heart issues and ADHD to COVID and cancer.

But what is it, who’s behind it, and does it work? Well, it turns out the answers to the first two questions will help us to figure out the third one.

The Black Oxygen Organics website (now archived) calls their product “A gift from the ground” and says:

“Fulvic acid is the end product and smallest particle of the decomposition of ancient, organic matter. Organic matter is just a fancy way of saying peat bog. When extracted, purified and delivered in a liquid supplement form, it carries all the nutritional information, anti-oxidant capacity and genetic coding of everything in that decomposed matter.”

So, basically this product is dirt. It’s fairly interesting dirt, as it’s being dug up from the bottom of a peat bog, and has been sitting there for thousands of years breaking down into chemicals such as fulvic acid, but it’s still dirt - and as such this is a very complex mix of chemicals, bacteria and all sorts of stuff. And people are meant to mix it with water and then spread it on their skin, bathe their children in it, and even drink it.

Of course, with something sciencey sounding like fulvic acid, there are going to be unscrupulous people who claim it has healing powers. And the internet is awash with companies selling fulvic acid tonics, drops, pills, powders and lotions. Even in NZ we have companies selling this cure-all and making claims about its amazing abilities.

Black Oxygen Organics, though, has been doing it differently. The company has been advertising their miracle mud through Instagram and Tik Tok, using the hashtag #BOO and harnessing the power of media influencers who are compensated for getting new customers to sign up to buy the dirt, through a Multi Level Marketing scheme - and at $110 for a small bag of dirt. And when it comes to this social media advertising, medical claims are being made by “independent agents” of this MLM, so you end up with an ever escalating list of fantastical claims being made - and an inability for the authorities to police the problem as it’s so widespread. And that’s how the company can get away with making claims of being able to treat autism, cancer and COVID - because technically the company itself isn’t making the claims, their “agents” are.

So, who’s behind this product? Marc Saint-Onge is the creator of Black Oxygen Organics, and it turns out that this isn’t his first time selling peat bog to unsuspecting customers:

Marc’s been in trouble in his native Canada since the 80s, when he was fined for practising medicine without a licence. As we just heard, Marc used to run a company called Golden Moor. That’s just one of several companies he’s created over the years since he was first in trouble - he’s also run Anti-Rheuma Bath and NuWTR. He also mentioned that he learned orthotherapy, a massage technique that claims to be able to treat medical conditions, and elsewhere he’s claimed hat he’s a naturopath, reiki master, herbalist and aromatherapist - all classic red flags, as these are all well known to be disproven alternative therapies.

So the claims are hard to believe, and the man has a history of selling mud and getting in trouble for it. But what about the evidence? Of course, there is none - or at least there’s no good quality evidence. That’s par for the course with alternative medicine. But there’s now so many bad claims on the internet that the website WebMD warns:

“People use fulvic acid for conditions such as allergies, eczema (atopic dermatitis), cancer, Alzheimer disease, and others, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.”

Beyond the baseless medical claims, in the US testing has been done on the Black Oxygen Organics product, showing that it has elevated levels of lead and arsenic. So this product is not only useless, it’s potentially dangerous. And this is pretty ironic, given that one of the claims made about the product is that it works as a heavy metal detox.

Marc’s LinkedIn page has been deleted, and his company has recently closed down, as has happened with Marc’s previous mud selling companies. Health Canada has been proactive in making this happen, including forcing a recall of their products and putting out an announcement that said things plainly:

“Stop taking these products”

But it looks like there’s a pattern here, though, and Marc will likely be back soon with another company selling his mud to unsuspecting consumers. Now, though, it seems like he’s learned the power of social media, and the ability of Multi Level Marketing schemes to hook people in, and so I suspect his next venture, if he doesn’t end up behind bars, will make him a lot of money again.

The Tiger King Psychic


I’m sure most people know the story of the Tiger King, a documentary series which became required viewing last year around the world when many countries went into lockdown. The series followed Joe Exotic, a flamboyant character who ran a big cat attraction and ended up behind bars for some of his questionable life decisions.


Season 2 of the show is now out, and I’ve been watching it recently. Given that Joe Exotic ended up in jail at the end of season 1, season two aims its focus elsewhere - concentrating on the disappearance of Carole Baskin’s husband Don Lewis, over 20 years ago.

In the middle of the season, Don’s now middle-aged children are shown trying to find out what happened to their father, employing a gimmicky lawyer and a conspiracy minded internet sleuth to help them. But one person in particular caught my eye - Troy Griffin, a psychic:

His title is a mouthful - “Christian Clairvoyant Empathic Psychic Medium”. Troy apparently uses remote viewing, and for murders can use this “skill” to find locations of interest.

From what I’ve found online, Troy claims that he works for police departments, charging up to $250 an hour. He told ABC news, who interviewed him as part of a story of a missing pregnant woman, that his success rate is around 20% (which is interestingly a lot more humble than many psychic detectives), but when pressed by ABC to give one example that they could look into, he couldn’t even manage to name one. The news company contacted the police about the pregnant woman case, to hear from them about Troy’s claims of being involved in the investigation, but the police said they had had “no official contact” with him and were unaware that he was involved at all.

In front of the cameras for season 2 of the Tiger King, Troy went looking for the place where Don was supposedly killed. When he finds what he thinks is the location, he talks of feeling “bad juju” and then he starts retching and becomes visibly upset - so much so, that the daughter of the deceased man has to comfort him.

To me, this is the absolute pits. I’ve always liked using the term grief vampire to refer to psychics, but to pretend that you’ve psychically connected to a traumatic event, and then play-act that you are affected by this trauma to the extent that a grieving family has to comfort you, is taking it to another level. This man had the nerve to appear on camera feeding on the emotions of a missing, possibly murdered, man’s children, getting them to give him attention and sympathy for his fake emotional state. Ugh.
 

Brian Tamaki is God

A couple of weeks ago I attended an online sermon from Destiny Church with a few friends. The sermon started off fairly tame, with Brian joking about viewers eating popcorn - so I went and grabbed a bag of popcorn for us to eat while we watched. I figured it was the least a group of heathens could do.

Brian continued a series of sermons he’s been giving for a few weeks now, about Revelation and the End of Days. Hilariously, when I checked the previous week’s sermon on YouTube this morning it came up with exactly 666 views:
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaq2IKPjy0g

Brian’s been telling his congregation that the end is nigh, but not too nigh. In fact, he made the claim that the end could come now, but he’s asked God to hold off - apparently Brian wants to have some “fun” before the end comes, so he’s applied for a time-out.

Brian spent some time talking about money, and how it is an idol that people worship - as he broadcast from his multi-million dollar mansion. He said that he is immune to the dangers of money, because he has money but money doesn’t have him. He went on to talk about other idols that people have, and said that the Sky Tower in Auckland is another idol - apparently it’s shaped like a vaccine needle, and we’re all worshipping this idol at the moment, rather than God. Brian’s message was very anti-vaccine, but at no point did he mention whether he has been vaccinated himself - I have my suspicions that he probably has been.

Eventually Brian, who has given himself promotions from Pastor to Bishop to Apostle, went one further. He talked about how one of the issues with the modern church is that, for all the good work they may do, nobody is willing to take the bold step of proclaiming that they are God - that God is a part of them. And of course Brian spelled out that he considers himself to be one with God - that, in part, he is God.

As a small mercy, viewership of the live stream never even reached 100 people, so it wasn't a great turnout - although maybe many of these viewers were entire families and possibly some people decided to watch the stream later on rather than streaming it live. But I hold out hope that, when given the choice to not watch Brian Tamaki spread his nonsense without them being spotted, many of his congregation just decided they’d rather have an extra couple of hours in bed!

Sneaky Scientology

Lake Alice Psychiatric Hospital made the news last week, with an 89 year old man being charged for his part in the abuse of children who were under the hospital’s care in the 1970s. Dr Selwyn Leeks, who was the lead psychiatrist at the centre, has been charged with “wilful ill treatment of a child”, but due to his ill health will not be prosecuted.

The media were obviously working hard to report on this news, and had been looking for experts to give them some informed opinions. Sadly for 3 News, they ended up being tricked into believing that the Citizens Commission for Human Rights (CCHR) is a legitimate, reputable organisation. In reality it’s a front organisation setup by Scientology, as a way to promote one of the many strange ideas that founder L. Ron Hubbard had - the idea that psychiatry is evil. The organisation’s website doesn’t even exist - there’s just a parking page:
 



L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology (an abusive group that deceivingly calls itself a religion) had mental health problems through most of his life, and was apparently dependent on psychiatric drugs. Possibly because of this dependence, he declared that psychiatry is all just a big lie, and that it is an “industry of death”. They even run a museum in Hollywood called “Psychiatry: An Industry of Death”. This is yet another of Hubbard’s weird ideas that Scientologists today are expected to continue with. As an illustration of just how oppressive Hubbard’s ideas are to Scientologists, I’ve heard that there’s a rule which means that Scientologists can only clean windows with vinegar and newspaper - because, according to L. Ron Hubbard, that’s all you should ever need for the job. I’ve taken some Scientology courses online, and they’re all about imparting Hubbard’s “wisdom” to followers - discredited ideas about how the mind works, how to learn properly, how to avoid trauma, and so on.

3 News ended up interviewing Mike Ferris, a well known Scientologist in New Zealand, last week - treating him like an expert. This isn’t overly surprising as it appears that Mike, and the CCHR, have also conned the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care into thinking that they are a legitimate organisation. Mike gave evidence to the commission in June this year.

In reality the Citizens Commission on Human Rights is just a mouthpiece for the ideological ideas of L. Ron Hubbard, a man who created a dangerous cult and hated psychiatry. It’s worrying to see victims, officials and the media all being hoodwinked by Scientology. These people are not involved because they want to help the victims, they just have an axe to grind - and, in fact, Scientology has mentally and physically mistreated, and continues to mistreat, thousands of its members every day.
 

If you have any news or thoughts you would like to see published in this newsletter, we would love to hear from you at:
[email protected]
if you want to support us by becoming a financial member, or would like to check your membership status, please go to:
https://skeptics.nz/join
Twitter
Facebook
YouTube
Website
Email
Copyright © 2021 NZ Skeptics, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

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